2014 Be Active Super League Series

first_imgCongratulations to the winners of the Touch Football Western Australia 2014 Be Active Super League Series grand finals, played on Sunday at Kingsway Regional Sports Centre, Madeley. Mixed OpenTompkins Park 7 defeated Perth Brothers 5MVP – Jason Lim (Tompkins Park) and Naomi Kara (Perth Brothers)Women’s OpenFremantle Districts 6 defeated Perth Brothers 5MVP – Jenaya Quan (Fremantle)Men’s OpenSouthern Districts 9 defeated ECU 7MVP – Alex Tuvik (Southern Districts)To view photos from the Super League Series, please visit the Touch Football WA Facebook page – www.facebook.com/touchfootballwa. Related LinksSuper League Serieslast_img read more

6 days agoChelsea boss Lampard: I know fans were getting frustrated

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Chelsea boss Lampard: I know fans were getting frustratedby Paul Vegas6 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Frank Lampard knows fans were frustrated during their 1-0 win over Newcastle United.A Marcos Alonso goal overcame a difficult opposition side and made it five wins in a row for the Blues.Lampard said: “The second half was the most pleasing thing. It was a good test for us today. We changed things a little in the second half and we showed a little more flexibility and creativity.”We were upbeat, we had urgency, the tempo was good, and that got us the win.”We want to score goals. You can see the fans – I think they’re happy with what they’re seeing at the moment. We want more.”If we want to keep moving up, we can do better. So far this season, though, things are going well.”On Ross Barkley’s injury, he added: “It’s an ankle injury. We need to assess it and see how bad it is.” last_img read more

Here’s Everything You Need To Know About Michigan’s 2015 Recruiting Class

first_imgJim Harbaugh interviewed on ESPNU.Jim Harbaugh has wrapped up his first recruiting class at the University of Michigan. The Wolverines finalized their 2015 class on Wednesday, National Signing Day. Here’s everything you need to know about Michigan’s 2015 class: The class ranks No. 38 in the country, No. 6 in the Big Ten, by 247 Sports. There are 14 players in the class, three of whom are from the state of Michigan. The class includes six 4-stars and eight 3-stars. The players are from Michigan, New Mexico, Ohio, New Jersey, New York, Florida, Alabama and Pennsylvania. Harbaugh thanked former Michigan coach Brady Hoke during a National Signing Day interview. Harbaugh referenced pickles and squirting while discussing his recruiting efforts. Here are some of the things Harbaugh had to say about his 2015 class: Harbaugh says Michigan’s class is “humble” but also winners.— Nick Baumgardner (@nickbaumgardner) February 4, 2015Harbaugh: All freshmen “have the license and ability to” play right now. “There’s no guarantees, only opportunities.”— Nick Baumgardner (@nickbaumgardner) February 4, 2015Harbaugh on the QBs: “They have a desire to compete in the classroom and on the field … I really like those kind of guys.”— Nick Baumgardner (@nickbaumgardner) February 4, 2015Harbaugh says “it’s possible” more players could join Michigan’s 2015 class.— Josh Newkirk (@JoshNewkirk7) February 4, 2015And here’s Michigan’s full, 14-man class, courtesy of 247 Sports: last_img read more

Mining Division Stages Technical Conference on November 23

first_img Principal Director, Ministry of Transport and Mining, Dr. Oral Rainford, told JIS News that the event “is going to be of interest to owners and operators of mines and quarries, suppliers of goods and services and contractors to the sector, including regulators and academics”.  “We have got to ensure that we build our economy and the sector, that we become more competitive, we begin to utilise more of our products in our economy and begin to produce higher-value products for a wider range of areas of industry,” he told JIS News. Mining and quarrying operators, as well as others involved in the minerals sector, are to benefit from the staging of a technical conference to be held on Wednesday (November 23) at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston, beginning at 9:00 a.m. Mining and quarrying operators, as well as others involved in the minerals sector, are to benefit from the staging of a technical conference to be held on Wednesday (November 23) at the Jamaica Conference Centre, downtown Kingston, beginning at 9:00 a.m.The event, organised by the Mining Division of the Ministry of Transport and Mining, is part of activities for National Minerals Week 2017 from November 19 to 25.It will examine technical and operational issues pertinent to the minerals sector. Divided into general and sector-specific segments, the conference will be informative and interactive.Principal Director, Ministry of Transport and Mining, Dr. Oral Rainford, told JIS News that the event “is going to be of interest to owners and operators of mines and quarries, suppliers of goods and services and contractors to the sector, including regulators and academics”.“We will be investigating a number of topics, which are going to be presented by a cadre of local and international experts,” he added.These are Climate-proofing the Minerals/Mining Sector – Risks and Implications; Mining and the Sustainable Development Goals; Land Management and Legacy Issues; Alumina Production and the Management of Alumina Waste; Diversification andValue-added Production; Health, Safety and Environmental Stewardship; Equipment Selection, Maintenance and Retooling; Energy and the Mining Sector; and Logistics for Jamaica’s Minerals Sector.center_img Story Highlights Dr. Rainford is urging sector members to “come out, bring your issues, and let’s have robust discussion and find solutions”.“We have got to ensure that we build our economy and the sector, that we become more competitive, we begin to utilise more of our products in our economy and begin to produce higher-value products for a wider range of areas of industry,” he told JIS News.National Minerals Week will provide opportunity to raise awareness about the mining sector and its contribution to economic growth.The activities for the week, which are being organised by public- andprivate-sector partners, include public discussions, lectures, town hall meetings, field trips, investment and networking fora, as well as a two-day exhibition and trade fair.last_img read more

Spoiler alert Denis Villeneuve answers just a few Blade Runner 2049 questions

first_imgAdvertisement Twitter Is Rick Deckard a replicant?The question has raged since Ridley Scott’s 1982 Blade Runner: Is replicant hunter Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford) a replicant himself? Ford has always argued that the character is human, while Scott has maintained Deckard is a replicant. The original novel by Philip K. Dick — the movie is based on 1968’s Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? — was filled with ambiguity.“In the book, blade runners themselves are doubting their own identity, like a doctor always in contact with sick people,” Villeneuve says. “They start to see symptoms of the sickness. They became paranoid.”Paranoia is an important theme of Blade Runner 2049.“Deckard himself is unsure of his own identity,” says Villeneuve, adding that replicant creator Niander Wallace (Jared Leto) “plays with (Deckard) with this at the end.”READ MORE Login/Register With: “I’ve been keeping secrets for two years, I don’t know if I can start talking now,” he says.But Villeneuve did answer a few of our burning questions. Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Film director Denis Villeneuve is seen during a photo call for his movie Blade Runner 2049 in Montreal on Sept. 28. (PAUL CHIASSON / THE CANADIAN PRESS) Advertisement Facebook t’s OK to still be a little perplexed about Blade Runner 2049.Director Denis Villeneuve leaves a lot unexplained in the complex, futuristic world he created for his critically lauded sci-fi epic, which he says has “a lot of layers.”Multiple viewings are recommended to better understand the dystopian universe inhabited by Ryan Gosling and Harrison Ford. Villeneuve is still mum about key aspects of the movie, like its ending.last_img read more

December 2 2013We reported on 10282013 on a pou

first_imgDecember 2, 2013We reported on 10/28/2013 on a pour for the footing of a shade structure across from the Arcosanti site. The SUNAMI shade structure was generously donated by alumnus The concrete has cured and day before Thanksgiving the crew erected the steel structure for the shade.There is a visitors trail that starts below the Crafts III building, winds its way into the valley and comes back up to an observation platform, where the structure is located.The SUNAMI shade is the centerpiece of a planned rest area on the Arcosanti visitor trail.last_img read more

House approves Rep Alexanders plan to protect survivors of sexual assault

first_img State Rep. Julie Alexander’s plan to ensure victims and witnesses of sexual assault are not silenced was approved today by the Michigan House with overwhelming support.Alexander, of Hanover, said the measure is part of a comprehensive bipartisan plan to solve problems brought to light by the House’s inquiry into the handling of the Larry Nassar sexual assault investigation.“The Nassar case made it clear that very serious cases of sexual assault can go unreported,” Alexander said. “We must take steps to fix the problems brought to light and prevent sexual predators from preying on our children.”Alexander said current Michigan law only covers the use of physical force in preventing the reporting of sexual assault to authorities. House Bill 4374 would make it crime for an individual to intentionally use their professional position of authority to prevent such a report.“We must never allow someone to use their position of authority to convince a subordinate not to report a crime,” Alexander said. “People who try to silence survivors of sexual abuse must be held accountable.”The plan now advances to the Senate for consideration.### Categories: Alexander News 19Jun House approves Rep. Alexander’s plan to protect survivors of sexual assaultlast_img read more

Novel technique potentially more effective in fighting against ovarian cancer

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 30 2018Instead of destroying a tumors’ blood supply, a first-ever University of Guelph study has proven that opening up the vessels is potentially more effective when it comes to fighting ovarian cancer.This is because open vessels provide a clear pathway for treatment to attack the tumor.”There hasn’t been much hope for women with ovarian cancer,” said Prof. Jim Petrik, lead author of the ground-breaking study. “What we are working on has never been done before and it has the potential to make a significant impact on effective treatment.”Published recently in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, the study is the first to investigate the impact of establishing a healthy blood supply to the tumor prior to treatment in mice models with an advanced stage of ovarian cancer.Current treatment has focused on destroying all the blood vessels and starving the tumor, but it has had poor success, said Petrik.”When you cut off a tumors’ blood supply it often becomes more aggressive,” he said. “We developed an approach where you only kill off the dysfunctional blood vessels. The result is a smaller, calmer tumor with a good blood supply. Once you have established an effective vascular system, you can use that system to get treatment to the tumor.”The study was conducted on mice models with an advanced stage of ovarian cancer because this type of cancer often goes undetected until the late stages when survival is low. The current mortality rate for ovarian cancer is 80 per cent.The first step was to prune the blood vessels supplying the tumor. Tumors grow at an intense rate and this rapid growth results in a vast, yet dysfunctional, blood supply. Once a smaller, healthier blood supply to the tumor was created, the mice were then treated with an oncolytic virus. This novel treatment uses viruses to infect and kill cancer cells and also stimulate anti-tumor responses in the body.Related StoriesUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerNew study to ease plight of patients with advanced cancerSpecial blood test may predict relapse risk for breast cancer patients”Using an oncolytic virus to treat ovarian cancer is currently underway in human clinical trials, but the success rate is very low. It’s difficult to get the virus to the tumor because of its dysfunctional vascular system.”By pruning the vessels to create a normal blood supply to the tumor, Petrik was able to dramatically increase the uptake and activity of the virus.”Using this combination of treatment we saw the tumor regress from an advanced state, but even more importantly we eradicated the spread of the cancer cells,” said Petrik. “With this type of cancer, the tumor will grow in the ovary to a large size and then typically spread to the abdomen causing perforation of the gut or sepsis. Women die from the metastatic nature of the disease not from the tumor.”Targeting the tumors’ blood supply and improving it rather than destroying it could also help other treatments, including chemotherapy, which are delivered through the vascular system, he added.”The treatment for ovarian cancer hasn’t really progressed in four decades. There are limited therapeutic advances, but these findings show that we may be able to improve the effectiveness of our current treatments if we improve the delivery system.” Source:https://news.uoguelph.ca/2018/10/novel-technique-can-potentially-improve-success-of-ovarian-cancer-treatment-study-reveals/last_img read more

Were the Vikings Smoking Pot While Exploring Newfoundland

first_imgThe discovery of cannabis pollen near a Viking settlement in Newfoundland raises the question of whether the Vikings were smoking or eating pot while exploring North America. The researchers also found evidence the Vikings occupied this outpost for more than a century, way longer than previously believed. Located in northern Newfoundland, the site of L’Anse aux Meadows was founded by Vikings around A.D. 1000. Until now, archaeologists believed that the site was occupied for only a brief period. The new research, published today (July 15) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that the Vikings lived there possibly into the 12th or even the 13th century. [In Photos: Viking Outposts Possibly Found in Canada]Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65940-were-vikings-smoking-pot-in-newfoundland.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Bog finds In August 2018, an archaeological team excavated a peat bog located nearly 100 feet (30 meters) east of the Viking settlement at L’Anse aux Meadows. They found a layer of “ecofacts” — environmental remains that may have been brought to the site by humans — that were radiocarbon dated to the 12th or 13th century. These ecofacts include remains of two beetles not native to Newfoundland — Simplocaria metallica, from Greenland, and Acidota quadrata, from the Arctic. The layer also held pollen from Juglans (walnuts) and from Humulus (cannabis), two species that don’t naturally grow at L’Anse aux Meadows; rather, the Vikings could have picked up all of these plant and animal species when they sailed south. [Photos: 10th-Century Viking Tomb Unearthed in Denmark] They also found the remains of dung from grazing caribou, as well as remains of wood and charcoal. The layer from the peat bog is similar to other “cultural layers from across the Norse North Atlantic,” the archaeological team wrote in the journal article. More evidence Additionally, the archaeologists performed Bayesian analysis — a type of statistical analysis — on radiocarbon dates from artifacts previously excavated at L’Anse aux Meadows. That analysis also suggested Viking occupation for up to 200 years. “This does not imply a continuous occupation,” the researchers wrote, noting that the Vikings could have abandoned and reoccupied L’Anse aux Meadows when it suited them. Did the Vikings use pot in Newfoundland? The finding of cannabis pollen raises the question of whether the Vikings used cannabis for making clothes or for medicinal-recreational purposes while they explored North America. Paul Ledger, the lead author of the paper and a postdoctoral fellow at Memorial University of Newfoundland urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. Ledger urged caution on the interpretation of the findings, noting that pollen can easily be carried by the wind. It’s also possible that some of the other “ecofacts” were brought to the peat bog by indigenous peoples who lived in Newfoundland, and not by the Vikings. [Fierce Fighters: 7 Secrets of Viking Seamen] Ultimately, “the results presented here [in the journal article] pose more questions than answers,” the archaeological team wrote. Reaction from other Viking researchers Viking researchers not affiliated with the research team urged caution about the results. “I think it is too early to draw any conclusions,” said Birgitta Wallace, a senior archaeologist emerita with Parks Canada who has done extensive research on the Vikings in North America. Wallace told Live Science that she isn’t convinced that the Vikings left behind these ecofacts. “I think it is highly unlikely that the Norse [another word for Vikings] would have returned in the 12th and 13th centuries, as there are no structures on the site from that period that could be Norse,” Wallace said. “We do know that there were indigenous people, ancestors of the Beothuk, on the site at that time.” Patricia Sutherland, a visiting scientist at the Canadian Museum of Nature who has also done extensive research on the Vikings in North America, said that while the Vikings could have been in Newfoundland during the 12th or 13th centuries, it is too early to say for sure. “It seems premature to suggest such a scenario on the basis of the ‘ecofacts’ listed in the paper,” Sutherland said. It’s possible that some of the beetles and plant pollen found in the layer were brought to L’Anse aux Meadows by the Vikings around A.D. 1000, and they continued to flourish after the Vikings left, Sutherland said. The research team plans to continue their work at L’Anse aux Meadows in August, Ledger said. The 25 Most Mysterious Archaeological Finds on Earth Photos: Viking Warrior Is Actually a Woman 30 of the World’s Most Valuable Treasures That Are Still Missing Editor’s note: This article was updated to fix a statement about the interpretation of the cannabis pollen. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndoTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryMeal Kit Wars: 10 Tested & Ranked. See Who WonTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndolast_img read more

Has the Earth Ever Been This Hot Before

first_img What is a Carbon Sink? What If a Giant Asteroid Had Not Wiped Out the Dinosaurs? Would you ever go on vacation to the North Pole? Unless you like subzero temperatures and Nordic-ski treks, probably not. But if you lived 56 million years ago, you might answer differently. Back then, you would have enjoyed balmy temperatures and a lush green landscape (although you would have had to watch out for crocodiles). That’s because the world was in the middle of an extreme period of global warming called the Paleo-Eocene Thermal Maximum, when the Earth was so hot that even the poles reached nearly tropical temperatures. But was the planet ever as hot as it is today, when every month the globe seems to be breaking one high-temperature record after another? It turns out that the Earth has gone through periods of extreme warming more than once. The poles have frozen and thawed and frozen again. Now, the Earth is heating up again. Even so, today’s climate change is a different beast, and it’s clearly not just part of some larger natural cycle, Stuart Sutherland, a paleontologist at the University of British Columbia, told Live Science. [How Often Do Ice Ages Happen?]  AdvertisementWhy Do We Dress Up and Trick or Treat on Halloween?Amid the silly and scary antics, Halloween is much more than just costumes and candy; in fact, the holiday has a rich and interesting history.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Do French Fries Taste So Bad When They’re Cold?01:08关闭选项Automated Captions – en-US facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65927-has-earth-been-this-hot-before.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0001:3801:38  Earth’s climate does naturally oscillate — over tens of thousands of years, its rotations around the sun slowly change, leading to variations in everything from seasons to sunlight. Partially as a result of these oscillations, Earth goes through glacial periods (better known as ice ages) and warmer interglacial periods. But to create a massive warming event, like the Paleo-Eocene Thermal Maximum, it takes more than a change in the tilt of Earth’s axis, or the shape of its path around the sun. Extreme warming events always involve the same invisible culprit, one we’re all too familiar with today: a massive dose of carbon dioxide, or CO2. This greenhouse gas was almost certainly responsible for the Paleo-Eocene Thermal Maximum. But how did CO2 concentrations get so high without humans around? Scientists aren’t absolutely sure, said Sébastien Castelltort, a geologist at the University of Geneva. Their best guess is that volcanoes spewed carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, trapping heat, and perhaps melting frozen pockets of methane, a greenhouse gas more potent than CO2 that had been long sequestered under the ocean. Just because extreme warming events spurred by greenhouse gases have happened before, doesn’t mean these events are harmless. Take, for instance, the Permian-Triassic extinction event, which struck a few million years before dinosaurs arose on the planet. If the word “extinction” isn’t enough of a clue, here’s a spoiler: it was an absolute disaster for Earth and everything on it. This warming event, which occurred 252 million years ago, was so extreme that Sutherland calls it the “poster child for the runaway greenhouse effect.” This warming event, which was also caused by volcanic activity (in this case, the eruption of a volcanic region called the Siberian Traps), triggered climate chaos and widespread death. “Imagine extreme drought, plants dying, the Saharah spreading throughout the continent,” Sutherland told Live Science. Temperatures rose 18 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius). (This is compared with the 2.1 F (1.2 C) rise in temperature we’ve seen since humans began burning fossil fuels). Around 95% of marine life and 70% of terrestrial life went extinct. “It was just too hot and unpleasant for creatures to live,” Sutherland said. It’s uncertain how high greenhouse gas concentrations were during the Permian-Triassic extinction event, but they likely were far higher than they are today. Some models suggest they grew as high as 3,500 parts per million (ppm). (For perspective, today’s carbon dioxide concentrations hover a little over 400 ppm — but that’s still considered high). But it’s the rate of change in CO2 concentrations that makes today’s situation so unprecedented. During the Permian Triassic extinction event, it took thousands of years for temperatures to rise as high as they did — according to some studies, as many as 150,000 years. During the Paleo-Eocene Thermal Maximum, considered an extremely rapid case of warming, temperatures took 10,000 to 20,000 years to reach their height. Today’s warming has taken only 150 years. That is the biggest difference between today’s climate change and past climatic highs. It’s also what makes the consequences of current climate change so difficult to predict, Castelltort said. The concern isn’t just “but the planet is warming.” The concern is that we don’t know how rapid is too rapid for life to adjust, he said. Based on past warming events, no experts could possibly say that the current rate of warming won’t have dramatic consequences, he said. “We just don’t know how dramatic,” he added.center_img Why Weather Affects Climate Change Belief Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryMeal Kit Wars: 10 Tested & Ranked. See Who WonTop 10 Best Meal DeliveryUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndolast_img read more

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