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Fitbits might not track your heart rate right if youre a person

first_img Fitbit Charge HR Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Comments Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Mentioned Above Fitbit Charge HR (black, large) The 17 best health and fitness apps for Apple Watch Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Review • One year later, Fitbit Charge HR stands out as the best Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier 3:49 Now playing: Watch this: Fitness trackers could have a flaw, according to Stat.  Sarah Tew/CNET Since their debut, fitness trackers and smartwatches have become a common sight on people’s wrists. As of February, Apple, Samsung and Fitbit made up 88% of smartwatch unit sales in 2018, the Smartwatch Total Market Report said. However, the gadgets might not work as effectively for people of color or those with tattoos, according to findings published Wednesday by Stat, a health and medicine publication. Users have complained on Fitbit forums and on Reddit about the smartwatches having trouble giving readings on people with darker skin. Fitbit replied in the community forum and said the Charge HR tracks “heart rate on every complexion” and directed users to a support article. “Fitbit takes accuracy very seriously and continuously performs studies to rigorously test the accuracy of our products among diverse groups of users,” a Fitbit spokesperson said in a statement Wednesday.The company said its PurePulse technology performs to industry-standard expectations for optical heart rate on the wrist. The company said it designed its optical system to emit green light at a sufficient strength to effectively penetrate darker skin and its detector is sensitive enough to accurately detect the heart rate signal.Fitbit, Samsung watches, Garmin devices and other wearables use green lights, which are cheaper than infrared lights, to take readings. Stat’s report said that green light has a shorter wavelength and is “more readily absorbed by melanin.” This makes it harder for people with darker skin tones to get accurate readings.  CNET may get a commission from retail offers. Apple told Stat that it also uses green lights to continuously monitor, but uses infrared light to take readings every five minutes. The company’s support page says its watch measures a user’s heart rate using photoplethysmography. PPG is a low-cost optical technique that illuminates the skin and measures changes in light absorption, according to the US Library of Medicine. Apple’s support page says this works because your blood reflects the red light and absorbs the green light. Samsung and Garmin didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.  Tagscenter_img Share your voice Fitbit Versa 2 and Fitbit Premium promise to revamp my… reading • Fitbits might not track your heart rate right if you’re a person of color • Originally published July 24.Update, July 25: Adds comments from Fitbit and more background information on the Apple Watch. See it Wellness Gadgets Mobile Apps Mobile 18 Photos 8 Fitbit Garmin Samsung Apple $94 Apple See Alllast_img read more

Company looking to market genetically modified apples runs into opposition

first_img © 2012 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. To do so, they have voluntarily submitted them to the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Canadian Food Safety Inspection Agency (CFSIA). The process for both is to first undergo a 60 day public comment period then secondly to have the product tested for health and safety. The CFSIA has already completed the comment period and will begin the safety inspection phase shortly. Meanwhile, opposition to the GM apples has grown. In a survey taken in Canada, sixty nine percent of 1,501 people polled said they would not support the approval of GM apples in their country. Across the border, the US Apple Association has announced its opposition to the sale of such apples, suggesting it would taint the image of apples grown in the United States.Okanagan Specialty Fruits maintains that the apples are not only safe, but would help improve sales of apples as they note that consumption of fresh apples in the US has fallen from an average of twenty pounds a year to just sixteen. They note that many people shy away from taking on a whole apple, but go for slices, but only those that haven’t turned brown. They say also that because grocery chains refuse apples that have browned due to bruising, non-browning apples would mean more money for growers.The process of modifying the apples, first developed in Australia by a team working with potatoes, involves placing an extra copy of a gene already in the apple that activates a self-defense mechanism that causes the gene responsible for the production of polyphenol oxidase, which is responsible for browning, to shut down. Okanagan Specialty Fruits has thus far developed just two varieties, Golden Delicious and Granny Smith which it plans to market under the name The Arctic Apple once they receive approval. Unfortunately for them, the Northwest Horticultural Council, which represents the fruit tree industry in Washington State, home to nearly sixty percent of the apples grown in the US, is also opposed to the idea. They say they don’t believe the apples are dangerous but believe it would be in the best interest of the apple industry to maintain the apple’s image as a natural healthy food.If approved the apples would represent the first genetically modified food sold directly to consumers in the United States. Other genetically modified food has been sold to the public for almost twenty years, but they have all appeared as processed ingredients. Explore further More information: www.arcticapples.comcenter_img (Phys.org) — Canadian company Okanagan Specialty Fruits has developed two varieties of genetically modified (GM) apples that don’t turn brown when cut, and wants to market them. Found – the apple gene for red Citation: Company looking to market genetically modified apples runs into opposition (2012, July 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-07-company-genetically-apples-opposition.htmllast_img read more