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October 25 2000 In the Arcosanti Cafe the chang

first_imgOctober 25, 2000In the Arcosanti Cafe,the changing of one garment to another signifies the changing of the season andthe coming of winter. A large, long tubular garment hangs down from the Gallerylevel of Crafts III building to the Cafe down below. Its purpose is to circulatethe warmer air that rises to the Gallery down to the Cafe in the building. Lookinginside the air tube, a fan creates a downward draft inside the winter garment. Looking inside the air tube, a fan creates a downward draft inside the wintergarment. Photo by: DoctressNeutopialast_img read more

Netflix has confirmed upcoming launches in South K

first_imgNetflix has confirmed upcoming launches in South Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong and Taiwan.The US-listed streaming service will hit the Asian territories in early 2016 as part of its wider global roll out.The four new Netflix service will follow the roll out in Japan, the first in the region and which launched earlier this month.News of the South Korea launch leaked over the weekend, with the streaming service reportedly looking to partner with local telcos, and Netflix confirmed it yesterday.The company said that it will launch in the new territories on smart TVs and connected devices, but did not specify any partnerships. It has also not released pricing information and there was no mention of a China launch, which has also been widely rumoured.“The combination of increasing Internet speeds and ubiquity of connected devices provides consumers with the anytime, anywhere ability to enjoy their favorite TV shows and movies on the Netflix service,” said Reed Hastings, Netflix CEO. “These four markets well represent those trends.”In January, Netflix said it plans to complete its global expansion within two years.last_img read more

NASA has launched an app for the fourth generation

first_imgNASA has launched an app for the fourth generation of Apple TV, letting users live-stream NASA TV and access videos and images on-demand.The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration will offer more than 15,000 images, display 2D and 3D satellite tracking maps and deliver the latest NASA mission information.“The NASA app has been a fantastic way for the public to experience the excitement of space exploration from their mobile devices. Now, users with the latest Apple TV can explore and enjoy our remarkable images, videos, mission information, NASA Television and more on the big screen with the whole family,” said David Weaver, NASA associate administrator for Communications.The NASA app is already available as an app for iPhone and iPad, and for Android and Fire OS devices.last_img read more

Novel technique potentially more effective in fighting against ovarian cancer

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Oct 30 2018Instead of destroying a tumors’ blood supply, a first-ever University of Guelph study has proven that opening up the vessels is potentially more effective when it comes to fighting ovarian cancer.This is because open vessels provide a clear pathway for treatment to attack the tumor.”There hasn’t been much hope for women with ovarian cancer,” said Prof. Jim Petrik, lead author of the ground-breaking study. “What we are working on has never been done before and it has the potential to make a significant impact on effective treatment.”Published recently in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, the study is the first to investigate the impact of establishing a healthy blood supply to the tumor prior to treatment in mice models with an advanced stage of ovarian cancer.Current treatment has focused on destroying all the blood vessels and starving the tumor, but it has had poor success, said Petrik.”When you cut off a tumors’ blood supply it often becomes more aggressive,” he said. “We developed an approach where you only kill off the dysfunctional blood vessels. The result is a smaller, calmer tumor with a good blood supply. Once you have established an effective vascular system, you can use that system to get treatment to the tumor.”The study was conducted on mice models with an advanced stage of ovarian cancer because this type of cancer often goes undetected until the late stages when survival is low. The current mortality rate for ovarian cancer is 80 per cent.The first step was to prune the blood vessels supplying the tumor. Tumors grow at an intense rate and this rapid growth results in a vast, yet dysfunctional, blood supply. Once a smaller, healthier blood supply to the tumor was created, the mice were then treated with an oncolytic virus. This novel treatment uses viruses to infect and kill cancer cells and also stimulate anti-tumor responses in the body.Related StoriesUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerNew study to ease plight of patients with advanced cancerSpecial blood test may predict relapse risk for breast cancer patients”Using an oncolytic virus to treat ovarian cancer is currently underway in human clinical trials, but the success rate is very low. It’s difficult to get the virus to the tumor because of its dysfunctional vascular system.”By pruning the vessels to create a normal blood supply to the tumor, Petrik was able to dramatically increase the uptake and activity of the virus.”Using this combination of treatment we saw the tumor regress from an advanced state, but even more importantly we eradicated the spread of the cancer cells,” said Petrik. “With this type of cancer, the tumor will grow in the ovary to a large size and then typically spread to the abdomen causing perforation of the gut or sepsis. Women die from the metastatic nature of the disease not from the tumor.”Targeting the tumors’ blood supply and improving it rather than destroying it could also help other treatments, including chemotherapy, which are delivered through the vascular system, he added.”The treatment for ovarian cancer hasn’t really progressed in four decades. There are limited therapeutic advances, but these findings show that we may be able to improve the effectiveness of our current treatments if we improve the delivery system.” Source:https://news.uoguelph.ca/2018/10/novel-technique-can-potentially-improve-success-of-ovarian-cancer-treatment-study-reveals/last_img read more

UNCled scientists receive 51 million grant to combat cervical cancer in Malawi

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 7 2019Backed by a $5.1 million grant, University of North Carolina and University of Malawi College of Medicine physicians and scientists will launch a multi-pronged effort to combat cervical cancer in Malawi, a country in sub-Saharan Africa where cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women.The United States Agency for International Development (USAID), in partnership with the U.S. National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, will fund a total of $12 million for two new programs to prevent cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa, including the project in Malawi and one in Mozambique.”By screening women, we are able to detect and treat precancerous changes before they develop into cervical cancer,” said Jennifer Tang, MD, MSCR, co-principal investigator of the study for UNC, associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology’s Division of Global Women’s Health and a member of the UNC Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases Malawi site. “Because women in Malawi weren’t getting screened, they were getting diagnosed very late. A late cervical cancer diagnosis is usually a death sentence in Malawi. That is why we’re trying to screen as many women as possible using a highly sensitive test, and to treat the women with evidence of precancerous lesions the same day. This increases the number of women screened and treated, and decreases loss to follow up.”Globally, the majority of cervical cancer deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, according to the World Health Organization. The disease is linked to the sexual transmission of HPV, or human papillomavirus.Malawi has the second-highest cervical cancer rate of any country in the world, according to 2018 estimates from the HPV Information Centre. That is due to high rates of HPV as well as HIV, and low population-level screening and vaccination, said Satish Gopal, MD, MPH, member of the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, cancer program director for UNC Project-Malawi and an associate professor in the UNC School of Medicine Division of Hematology/Oncology.In 2004, the Malawi Cervical Cancer Control Program set a target of screening 80 percent of eligible women for cervical cancer. Yet, less than a third had completed this screening as of 2015, according to data from the program.”Progress is being made, but there is a tremendous amount still to do to stem the cervical cancer epidemic,” said Gopal. “We need to understand how to most efficiently deliver the preventive services to the highest number of women, and avert these unnecessary cancer deaths.”With the new funds, UNC-Chapel Hill and the Malawi College of Medicine will evaluate the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of integrating self-collection HPV testing into voluntary family planning clinics and community-based sites in Malawi. The researchers also are planning to investigate the effectiveness of treating precancerous lesions using a method known as thermocoagulation in a “screen-and-treat” strategy.”We couldn’t be more proud of this team of U.S.- and African-trained investigators receiving such a large award to better understand the global burden of cervical cancer,” said Myron Cohen, MD, director of the UNC Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases. “UNC faculty and staff from across the campus have worked hard over the past 25 years to build a self-sustaining model of clinical care, research and training in Malawi for health professionals from the United States and in-country to succeed and improve health for all. This grant exemplifies this mission.”Recent technological advances have made the project possible, Tang said. HPV testing can now be completed rapidly to determine if a woman has a strain of the virus that is high-risk for causing cervical cancer. With the results, providers can determine which women might need same-day treatment of precancerous cervical lesions. Thermocoagulation involves using a portable, battery-operated device that can easily be used in settings with limited resources, she said.Related StoriesUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerHow cell-free DNA can be targeted to prevent spread of tumorsSugary drinks linked to cancer finds study”Transportation is one of the biggest barriers to treatment for women in Malawi, along with cost,” she said. “We’re trying to save women from having to come to the clinic multiple times, spending money and time they don’t have. As soon as we find a problem, we are treating it immediately.”UNC physicians and researchers have been collaborating with Malawian health leaders since 1990 to provide clinical care and research for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases. This partnership led to the establishment of the UNC Project-Malawi site in Lilongwe. As prevention and treatment interventions have improved the survival rates of people living with HIV in Malawi, cancer has emerged as a growing health problem in the country. In 2014, the Malawi Cancer Consortium was launched with funding from the National Cancer Institute to help fight cancer, and HIV-associated cancers in particular.Last year, Malawian leaders traveled to UNC-Chapel Hill to meet with Carolina leadership, physicians and scientists to prepare for the opening of Malawi’s first dedicated cancer center, which is expected this year and is being built adjacent to UNC Project-Malawi.The newly funded cervical cancer project builds on the results of a pilot study led by Lameck Chinula, MMED, FCOG, who is co-principal investigator for this project and the first Malawian-trained obstetrician and gynecologist at UNC Project-Malawi. During the pilot study, more than 400 rural women were screened for cervical cancer using a community-based screening approach, and then treated with thermocoagulation if they were found to have precancerous lesions.Chinula, who is also a research assistant professor in the UNC School of Medicine’s Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, was trained in South Africa through funding from the UNC Institute for Global Health & Infectious Diseases partnership with the Fogarty AIDS International Training and Research Program and the Gilead Training Fellowship. To address another critical need, he was also trained to perform the surgical procedure used to treat invasive cervical cancer – radical hysterectomy – by two U.S. gynecologic oncology specialists. Chinula now strives to educate other clinicians, and Malawian women in general, to stop cervical cancer before it becomes deadly.”We would like to see providers maximize any contacts they have with women and use the most efficient, culturally-sensitive screening test available to identify patients needing treatment for cervical pre-cancer,” Chinula said. “By allowing women to self-collect specimens for HPV testing, we hope to empower and increase the number of women screened. As a clinician-researcher who has had to deliver the bad news of an incurable cervical cancer diagnosis in Malawi, I can look to the future with hope that a day will come when these diagnoses will be a rare occurrence.”According to the USAID, this is the first time the agency has funded programs to prevent cervical cancer in the context of broader women’s health, other than under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). These new programs in Malawi and Mozambique will coordinate closely with PEPFAR investments in both countries.”Women who aren’t screened and treated for cervical cancer have a higher risk of dying of this preventable disease,” said UNC Lineberger’s Jennifer S. Smith, PhD, professor of epidemiology at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. “We need to do all that we can to increase cervical screening rates globally. We’re testing a self-sampling technology that should increase screening coverage dramatically, but we do have unanswered questions about implementation within existing health care systems and cost. Study findings will inform future policy and implementation, not only for self-collection tests in Malawi, but other countries.”Source: http://unclineberger.org/news/unc-led-team-awarded-5-1mlast_img read more

Delhi 3yearold girl who fell off flyover dies

first_imgDelhi: 3-year-old girl who fell off flyover diesThe girl and her uncle fell off the Badarpur flyover in South Delhi on Thursday.advertisement Indo-Asian News Service New DelhiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 22:53 IST Image for representationHIGHLIGHTSThe girl and her uncle fell off the Badarpur flyover in South DelhiBoth the victims were admitted in a hospitalVictim’s uncle alleged that a Chinese ‘manja’ had stuck on his neck following which he lost control of his bikeThe three-year-old girl, who along with her uncle fell off the Badarpur flyover in south Delhi on Thursday, succumbed to her injuries in south Delhi on Friday night, police said.The police said a damaged Bullet motorcycle belonging to the man was found at the Badarpur flyover on the carriage way towards Faridabad. Both the victims were admitted in a hospital. In the accident Mohan (33) sustained injuries, while his niece Dipti was stated to be very critical.”It is saddening the little girl succumbed to her injuries on Friday night. I would like to point out that kids should not be made to sit in front on the bikes. Both the victims were without safety gears in this case,” said Chinmoy Biswal, Deputy Commissioner of Police (South-East).In the statement recorded by the police, the victim had alleged that a Chinese ‘manja’ (string used to fly kites) got stuck in his neck following which he lost control and his bike hit the divider and they fell down from the flyover. However, the police have not found anything from the spot.For the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySanjay Nirala Nextlast_img read more

Let there be no doubt No act of terror will go unpunished

first_img Press Trust of India New DelhiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 14:48 IST Army chief General Bipin Rawat was speaking at an event on 20 Years after Kargil Conflict. (Photo:Pankaj Nangia/India Today)HIGHLIGHTSAny misadventure by Pakistan Army will be repelled with punitive response: Army chiefArmy chief says armed forces stand resolute and ready to defend territorial integrityRise of non-state actors and readiness to use terror and other irregular methods of fighting have become a new norm: Army chiefAny misadventure by Pakistan Army will be repelled with punitive response and no act of terror will go unpunished, Army chief General Bipin Rawat said Saturday.Speaking at an event on ’20 Years after Kargil Conflict’, General Bipin Rawat said Pakistan Army, time and again, resorts to misadventure, either through state-sponsored terrorism or intrusions in India.”The Indian armed forces stand resolute and ready to defend our territorial integrity. Let there be no doubt that misadventures will be repelled with a punitive response,” he said.The rise of non-state actors and the readiness to use terror and other irregular methods of fighting have become a new norm, he said.Addition of cyber and space domain has changed the battlefield scenario, the Army chief noted.Rawat also asserted that no act of terror will go unpunished. “Surgical strikes post-Uri and Balakot (terror attacks) have amply demonstrated our political and military resolve against terror. Any act of terror will not go unpunished,” Rawat added.The army chief also said there has been no intrusion by the Chinese in Ladakh’s Demchok sector. “There is no intrusion,” Rawat said on the sidelines of an event.His statement came amidst reports of Chinese soldiers crossing the Line of Actual Control (LAC) last week after some Tibetans hoisted Tibetan flags on the occasion of Dalai Lama’s birthday on July 6.”Chinese come and patrol to their perceived Line of Actual Control…we try and prevent them. But at times there are celebrations that take place at the local levels. Celebrations were going on our side by our Tibetans in the Demchok sector. Based on that, some Chinese also came to see what was happening. But there has been no intrusions. Everything is normal,” the Army chief had said.READ | No intrusion by Chinese in Ladakh’s Demchok, says Army chief Bipin RawatWATCH | Army general exposes Pakistan’s lie on terrorFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySumeda Tags :Follow India Pakistan Let there be no doubt: No act of terror will go unpunished, says Army chief General RawatArmy chief General Bipin Rawat has said the Indian armed forces are ready to defend the territorial integrity. “Let there be no doubt that misadventures will be repelled with a punitive response,” he said.advertisement Nextlast_img read more