31 07 19

first_imgLabour-affiliated trade unions met today to discuss the party’s Brexit position. Pressure has been building on the leadership, and Jeremy Corbyn in particular, to have a clear stance and back Remain – before being forced to do so by conference in September. But there has been resistance from Unite the Union general secretary Len McCluskey, as well as staffers in the leader’s office and dozens of Labour MPs. In addition to concerns about the potential electoral impact of such a shift, and the possible effect on popular faith in our democratic processes, opponents of ‘going full Remain’ have also pointed out that there are flaws in the plan to renegotiate the Brexit deal then put it to a public vote and campaign for Remain.This appears to have been a key factor in the conclusions reached at the meeting today. The final text produced by the unions shows that they have considered the argument that it would not be logical in the event of an early election for Labour to propose renegotiating Brexit, then campaign for Labour’s deal in parliament, hold a referendum and campaign against that very deal. The unions have taken into account this criticism by separating the TULO Brexit position into two scenarios. Below is the full text.Scenario 1The Labour Party should confirm that whatever deal is negotiated by the new Tory Prime Minister or an exit based on no deal should be put to the people in a public confirmatory vote. The options must be:Accepting the deal or a Tory no deal in the knowledge of its termsRemaining in the European Union.In this event, the Labour Party should campaign to remain in the European Union.Scenario 2In the event that a general election is called, Labour’s manifesto position should be: Negotiating with the European Union to respect the Brexit vote from 2016, reflecting the negotiating priorities that Labour has outlined. Any final Labour deal should then be put back to the people. The option on the ballot paper should be:Accepting the Labour negotiated dealRemaining in the European UnionThe Labour Party’s campaign position on such a ballot should depend on the deal negotiated.The first scenario makes clear that Labour would back Remain against a Tory deal or no deal. This position will please Remainers and be seen as sensible by most in the party. But according to the second scenario, Labour’s manifesto in a snap election would advocate renegotiating the deal, which would be put to a public vote but Labour would not necessarily support either its own deal or Remain. It would “depend on the deal negotiated”. This compromise is likely to be regarded as more ‘fudge’ by critics: it very explicitly declines to take a view on whether Remain is better than a Labour-negotiated deal, which is the crux of the ongoing controversy after all.Tags:Labour /Trade Unions /Brexit /Remain /last_img read more

31 07 19

first_imgThis weekend marks the last chance to see Eliana Lopez’s one-woman re-enactment of the political scandal that almost ended her husband’s career. Political wonks and gossip mongers alike will find plenty of material to think about, including the possible motives and actions of just about everyone involved.The media drama began shortly after former city supervisor Ross Mirkarimi’s swearing-in as sheriff on January 8, 2012. Less than a week later he was arrested on charges of domestic violence battery, child endangerment, and dissuading a witness. A criminal trial ended in a plea bargain in March 2012, with Mirkarimi facing a misdemeanor false imprisonment charge and six months’ separation from Lopez and their three-year-old son.The drama only heightened when Mayor Ed Lee demanded Mirkarimi’s resignation.  The sheriff refused to comply and the mayor then moved to oust him on grounds of official misconduct. The Board of Supervisors ultimately fell two votes short of removing Mirkarimi from office in December 2012, and he is running for re-election this November.The details are hardly the stuff of comedy, but if you see the play, Lopez is almost guaranteed to make you laugh – thanks mostly to the exaggerated caricatures she pulls off with considerable acting skill (she was a film and TV star in her native Venezuela). 0% Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%center_img Her mother, grandfather, neighbor, and especially her husband are captured and reflected in a manner that, without being unkind, injects a respectable dose of humor into a story that is essentially a telenovela: She  – new to the city, new to a marriage, and isolated by language and culture; he – ambitious, busy in his career, and unavailable.Mirkarimi and Lopez (really Lopez and Lopez) fight when she tells him about her plans to travel to Venezuela with the couple’s then three-year-old son. The way Lopez remembers her arm being grabbed is telling: sudden and anti-climactic. The arm-grab is minimized to a non-event, a small marital error that was later blown out of proportion. Others, however, saw it as domestic abuse.Most effectively, Lopez takes on the roles of people with whom her relationships were less intimate. At one point, she impersonates a member of the media, saying that reporters and bloggers wanted to talk about her, not with her. Three years later, the tables are turned: Speaking for all the other players in her controversy, Lopez tells her tale in a controlled environment where she is in her element and nobody can interrupt.The prime example is the Mayor Ed Lee character, a squinty-eyed, heavily-accented “Mr. Lie” who walks around pocketing money while promising to rid the city of crime. (The first joke of the evening is a disclaimer warning that the characters are fictional and any similarity to real persons is coincidental.) Here, Lopez is openly accusatory: Mr. Lie extorts a jailed Mirkarimi, and tells him to confess and resign, so that the public might forget Mr. Lie’s fiscal transgressions and focus on Mirkarimi’s scandal instead. The tired, racist stereotype got some laughs from the Victoria Theater audience, but falls flat in a broader context and was a poor choice by Lopez.While it’s unlikely the piece will change anyone’s mind, it does offer a perspective Lopez was unable to convey as the city’s drama ran its course. And, in acting out the drama she lived through, Lopez also claims and controls her story – something that did not happen when she told Ivory Madison, the friend and neighbor who recorded a video of Lopez after the fight with her husband in case it came to a custody battle. Lopez says she was promised confidentiality, but her neighbor went to the police, and thus started the scandal. The show will be playing at the Victoria Theater on 16th and Capp streets this Friday and Saturday at 8 to 9:15 p.m., and on Sunday from 6 to 7:15 p.m. Tickets are available here. last_img read more

31 07 19

first_imgConway’s endorsements appear on every candidate’s page as “endorsed by” or “not endorsed by.” Only two other people and 11 groups are given the same prominence, joining Conway in Crowdpac’s key 14. A note explains, “These key leaders and groups hold a wide range of political stances.” However, almost any 14 leaders and groups, chosen at random, would “hold a wide range of political stances.” Why were those specific 14 chosen? No explanation of the criteria is provided on Crowdpac.For the record, the two other people in Crowdpac’s key 14 are Dianne Feinstein and Gavin Newsom, which means that Crowdpac considers it more important for voters to see the endorsement of former mayors than the endorsement of the current mayor, Ed Lee.The groups in Crowdpac’s key 14 are the Harvey Milk LGBT Democratic Club, San Francisco Alliance for Jobs and Sustainable Growth, San Francisco Democratic Party, San Francisco Green Party, San Francisco Labor Council, San Francisco Latino Democratic Club, San Francisco Moderates, San Francisco Tech Democrats, San Francisco Tenants Union, San Francisco Women’s Political Committee, and San Francisco Young Democrats. The group names appear on the candidate’s pages as simple text, not linked to a full slate of endorsements or any information about the group, as users expect on an interactive website like Crowdpac.It is unlikely to be a mistake when a company like Crowdpac makes data difficult to find. Crowdpac is a well-funded company of data experts, “putting informative political data in our users’ hands,” as it says on Crowdpac’s About page. They know how to provide data, when they want to.The candidate endorsements from most individuals and groups are difficult to find on Crowdpac. On a candidate page, a user might expect a link to See More Endorsements, following the endorsements from Crowdpac’s key 14, but no link is there. The website has only one link to a page of all individuals and groups, if the user can remember where the link is. (Starting from a candidate page, a user goes back the San Francisco Election page and clicks the See All link.) Then the user searches among individuals and groups, which are not in alphabetical order, and clicks an individual or group, finally seeing candidate endorsements. To see the candidate endorsements of five or ten groups, the user opens five or ten pages.For the data experts at Crowdpac, it would be simple to provide an interactive table of endorsements, with candidates across the top, and with people and organizations down the side. (The people and organizations would probably be arranged from more liberal to more conservative, an assessment that Crowdpac specializes in.) Instead, candidate endorsements are difficult to find on Crowdpac, except for the candidate endorsements from Crowdpac’s key 14, including Conway.The website doesn’t explain Conway’s connection to Crowdpac. Instead, the website emphasizes that Crowdpac is independent. The closest Crowdpac comes to explaining a conflict of interest is a statement on the About Crowdpac page, “We have raised our seed round of financing from several top tier venture capital funds and angel investors, including NEA, InterWest, Index Ventures, CAA and SV Angel.” SV Angel means Conway, a firm where he is the founder and co-managing partner.On October 16, Crowdpac retweeted a message from Conway, “Join me and vote in the 11/3 San Francisco election. Visit @Crowdpac to see my ballot and create one of your own.” The ballot that a user creates on Crowdpac is seen by the people a user shares it with, but Ron Conway’s ballot is seen by everyone who visits Crowdpac.How is this not hypocrisy, to claim to believe in small donors but emphasize the choices of a big donor? 0% Jay Martin is a technical writer, Mission resident, and MissionLocal member.Crowdpac, a website of election information, promotes the endorsements of Ron Conway, an investor in Crowdpac and Airbnb, while claiming to be “the only objective, data-driven guide to the candidates and ballot measures.”Crowdpac states on its FAQ page that it is “non-partisan and does not support any specific candidates or issue campaigns.” Its stated goal is to be a website for “learning about the candidates on your local ballot and supporting those across the country that match your priorities,” according to CEO and cofounder Steve Hilton in his blog post “Why We Launched Crowdpac.”A close look at Crowdpac’s website and Twitter account casts doubt on Crowdpac’s claims. In subtle and obvious ways, Crowdpac is sending a message instead of staying nonpartisan. The most obvious example is the prominence given to the candidate endorsements of Ron Conway.center_img Tags: Election 2015 Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more

31 07 19

first_img Tags: Business • mission street Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0% “There is never a dull moment on Mission Street. It feels very authentic to San Francisco and has the hustle and bustle feel that drew me to this city in the first place,” he wrote.He also wanted to make the space really his own – and pulled out all the stops. DiCaro, it turns out, is also a fairly accomplished woodworker, and built all the cabinetry and countertops by hand (with some help from his carpenter father).The resulting aesthetic is rich with lots of highly polished dark wood, and heavy, luxurious accoutrements like an antler chandelier.DiCaro describes it as “posh and unassuming, never pretentious, always comfortable and welcoming.”After more success than he could handle at his smaller shop, DiCaro opted for a bigger space – and company. Six chairs are available inside The Refinery, and DiCaro is already finding more groomers to serve customers. His own workday, beginning between 9 and 10 a.m., often stretches past 8 p.m. or to 9 p.m.The experience itself is less about luxury and more about the person wielding the clippers.“The other day I had a guy see me, I cut his hair in hair school. I was honored that he tracked me down and wanted to see my shop.”In fact, plenty of transplants from Atlanta have reconnected with DiCaro in his adopted San Francisco – the owner of local shop Schatzi provided some of the other eclectic artifacts that adorn the grooming club (like a skateboard with Pabst Blue Ribbon logos and a mermaid figurehead.)One recent client, San Francisco teacher Ben Dorey, is also a figure from DiCaro’s past, having lived within a few blocks of him in Atlanta. “It’s just a great experience. Tony is a great conversationalist with just about anybody,” Dorey says.In his case, a grooming session is an opportunity to kick back – Dorey doesn’t drink, except a little at weddings and at appointments with DiCaro.“It’s sort of like my version of a spa day,” he said. “It’s an hour of relaxation where I talk about whatever I want to talk about and I’m pampered and well cared for.”“To get groomed can be more than getting your hair cut,” DiCaro said.The Refinery2589 Mission St415-525-4751 0%center_img Sure, Mission Street has plenty of hair salons, but have you ever been to a “grooming club”? That’s the idea behind The Refinery, now open on Mission Street near 22nd: Not really a barbershop, not really just a place to get your hair cut, but a place to be thoroughly groomed.It’s not a barber shop because DiCaro is not a barber (he doesn’t offer shaves using a straight razor), and because he shies away from being too gender-specific. Anyone can have short hair, and that is what he grooms.“I want you to come in and feel like you got groomed and pampered,” he said.Tony DiCaro, a cosmetologist from Atlanta, opened a studio in the ActivSpace building on Treat Street three years ago. He found himself quickly and profoundly booked solid and decided he needed to expand. He discovered the space at 2589 Mission Street, and immediately felt a connection.last_img read more

31 07 19

first_img 0% Firefighters quickly controlled a small blaze inside a top floor apartment in a multi-story residential building on Folsom Street near 24th Street Saturday afternoon. No injuries were reported and firefighters indicated nobody would be displaced.One firefighter on the scene said the apparent cause was an overheated battery for an electric bicycle, though he did not know how the overheating occurred.A tenant of the building confirmed no residents would be displaced but declined to comment further.Firefighters first reported the blaze at 12:06 p.m., and the fire appeared under control by 12:26 p.m. Debris from the fire on Folsom St. near 24th. Photo by Lola M. Chavez center_img Tags: Fires • housing Share this: FacebookTwitterRedditemail,0%last_img read more